Archive | September 2013

WHY YOU SHOULD SPEND YOUR MORNINGS IN A CAVE

“Individuals are really good at generating a whole lot of ideas, while groups are good at selecting, shaping, and refining those ideas.”

PEOPLE ARE MOST CREATIVE WHEN THEY WORK WITHOUT DISTRACTION. BUT WHAT DOES THAT MEAN FOR THE TEAM? WELCOME TO THE CAVE-DWELLING FUTURE OF COLLABORATION.


If you want to be your most creative self, research suggests that you should start your day in a cave–and find a way to make it an expected thing with your team.

Why? Because as Kellogg School of Management professor Leigh Thompson tells Fast Company, people have work styles that range from an independent to an interdependent orientation, sort of like how people are introverts or extroverts, with ambiverts in the middle. The independent worker will kindly ask that you leave her alone while she gets her work done–while the interdependent worker can’t function without being around others.

The thing is, she says, you need both:

“Creativity happens when you work independently,” she says, echoing our finding that insight comes from not having distractions. “Individuals are really good at generating a whole lot of ideas, while groups are good at selecting, shaping, and refining those ideas.”

Unfortunately, the way we structure our days–and our meetings–doesn’t tend to reflect this understanding: Research has shown that people have worse ideas when asked to brainstorm in a meeting rather than when they’re asked to ideate on their own. The new groupthink has already set in, fizzling insights before they’re ready to be uncorked.

THINKING ABOUT GROUPTHINK

The question, then, is how to prevent groupthink and still bring out the best in the independents and the interdependents among us. We’ve already discussed a way to solve it in meetings, a technique that Thompson calls brainwriting, which is like brainstorming, but instead of getting together and alternately shouting half-baked ideas and staring at each other, you write down your suggestions before you start workshopping them.

That’s great for meetings, but what about our days? How do we structure them in a way that caters to the independents among us–the writer and his manuscript, the programmer and her code, and the like–and how those focused folks can still work well in a group setting?

ENTER: THE CAVE AND THE COMMONS

The best way to tackle this problem, Thompson says, is by designing the office with acave-and-commons setup. Like:

. . . private spaces (caves) where one can work without being interrupted by colleagues walking by or cube chatter. . . . And close-by, common areas where team members can pull together for critical face-to-face time. If you take all the caves away, people are distracted and interrupted and creativity falters.

SO HOW DO YOU USE THE CAVE WELL?

Like any relationship, it’s a matter of open communication.

Thompson’s advice: Let the independent start the day in her cave, free of email, drop-in meetings, and other subtle suckers of productivity. Then have everybody assemble around the campfire at a regular hour–like maybe around lunchtime.

“Then everybody knows what to expect and will accomplish more,” she says.

This way, the independents have their independence protected–and the interdependents get their interaction fix.

Bottom Line: Protect the cave–but keep the teamwork.

~Curated by http://www.pass-the-idea.com

Source: http://www.fastcompany.com/3017987/bottom-line/why-you-should-spend-your-morning-in-a-cave

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PwC Study Finds Innovation Moving From Fringe Activity to Mainstream

Top Innovators Expect US$250 Billion, Five-Year Revenue Boost

Companies are fundamentally changing the way they innovate, the study found. Innovation has moved beyond products and services and now regularly encompasses business models, operating systems and customer experience. Additionally, collaboration with both internal and external partners has become vital to innovation efforts.

DALIAN, China, Sept. 11, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The world’s most innovative companies expect to grow by more than 60% over the next five years, adding a total of more than US$250 billion in new revenues as a result of sophisticated approaches to innovation in all areas of their operations.

A new PwC study, Breakthrough Innovation and Growth–your $500 million opportunity, released here at a meeting of the World Economic Forum, found a direct correlation between excellence in innovation and superior revenue growth. According to the study, the top 20% of innovators worldwide say their growth rate over the next five years will be double the global average and three times higher than that of the least innovative companies.

Companies are fundamentally changing the way they innovate, the study found. Innovation has moved beyond products and services and now regularly encompasses business models, operating systems and customer experience. Additionally, collaboration with both internal and external partners has become vital to innovation efforts.

Said David Percival, PwC’s Global Client Innovation Leader:

“Innovation has gone mainstream. Five years ago, expansion into China was seen as the most powerful source of growth for just about every business. Now, companies see that innovation presents them with greatest potential for growth.”

While innovation was once thought to be the province of technology and consumer goods companies in developed economies, it has now become a key driver of growth for companies regardless of sector or geography. The top tier of innovators identified in the study come from a diverse range of sectors from healthcare to automotive to financial services, and from India, to the Netherlands and Brazil.

Said Rob Shelton, PwC’s Global Innovation Strategy Leader:

“Business leaders must understand that there are already innovation pioneers in their industry and around the world. Leaders must be ready to step up to disruptive challenges from their more innovative competitors.”

The study found that successful innovation is dependent on well-developed strategies. Nearly 80% of top innovators said they had well defined innovation strategies, compared with less than half of among the least innovative companies.

The most innovative companies treat innovation in the same way as any other business or management process, the study found. Just one in five of the most innovative companies described their approach to innovation as ‘informal,’ compared with about one-third of the least innovative. Executives from the most successful companies say they devote more time to innovation, have more incentives to collaborate and are more likely to be supported by senior management.

Comparing innovation

The study found major differences between the most and least innovative companies. Among them:

  • The most innovative companies anticipate 62.2% revenue growth over the next five years compared with 20.7% for the least innovative.
  • The combined revenue growth of the most innovative companies is forecast to be US$252 billion over next five years compared with US$93 billion among the least innovative.
  • Two-thirds of the most innovative companies say innovation is a competitive necessity compared with 19% among the least innovative.
  • Nearly 80% of the most innovative say they have a well-defined innovation strategy compared with 47% of the least innovative.
  • The most innovative companies are almost twice as likely to be targeting breakthrough and radical innovations.
  • The most innovative companies are more likely to use corporate venturing to drive growth: 13% vs. 7%.
  • The most innovative companies use social media more often to collaborate externally: 67% vs. 39%.

The most innovative are less likely to manage innovation efforts informally: 21% vs. 32%.

Notes:

  • PwC surveyed 1,757 C-suite and executive-level respondents responsible for overseeing innovation within their company across more than 25 countries and 30 sectors. To our knowledge, this is the largest and most comprehensive study of C-suite executives exploring innovation from a global, multi-sector perspective.

~ curated by TME World of Marketing, September 18, 2013

Source:  http://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2013/09/11/572852/10048142/en/Top-Innovators-Expect-US-250-Billion-Five-Year-Revenue-Boost.html

Pass The Idea in NZ Innovators Awards finals

2013 NZ Innovators Awards finalists revealed

By Idealog, September 10, 2013 @ 2:32 pm

The world’s first cardiovascular exercise bike, an aerial robot, a method of controlling insects with sex, a novel bladder cancer detection test and a cardboard pet casket range are among the finalists of this year’s New Zealand Innovators Awards, the annual awards that celebrate the best of Kiwi innovation.

The winners will be revealed in a ceremony in Auckland on 17 October.

This year’s winners will join a hall of fame of well known Kiwi innovators. Revolution Fibres was crowned supreme winners at last year’s awards for using nanotechnology to create super strong fibres predominantly for air filters for home ventilation systems, high-strength fishing rods and fabric to enhance skin healing. Vaughn Rowsell’s Vend won the top prize in 2011 for its development of a cloud-based point-of-sale payment system.

Below is the full list of finalists of the 2013 New Zealand Innovators Awards. Don’t forget you can still nominate your favourite innovator, innovation and organisation for the People’s Choice Award, part of the Innovators awards. Nominations for the People’s Choice Award close this Wednesday.

Innovation in Design and Engineering
Sponsored by James & Wells Intellectual Property Limited

Air New Zealand – Air New Zealand SkyCouch
Auckland Harbour Bridge Pathway Trust – SkyPath
Bodystance Ltd – Backpod™
Dezign Imagineering Ltd – YouBike
Droidworx Ltd NZ – EV-Recon Aerial Robot
StretchSense Limited – StretchSense

Innovation in Environment and Agriculture
Sponsored by Bayer New Zealand

Auckland Harbour Bridge Pathway Trust – SkyPath
FPA NZ – FPA Direct
Gallagher – i Series Fence Energizer system
Hydroxsys Limited – Hydroxsys, reducing the footprint of Heavy Industry
Plant and Food Research – Controlling insects with sex – Pheromones for Sustainable Pest Control
University of Otago – X-imm24

Innovation in Health and Science
Sponsored by Ko Awatea CMDHB

Bodystance Ltd – Backpod™
Footfalls and Heartbeats Ltd (FHL) – Footfalls and Heartbeats
Pacific Edge – Cxbladder; A novel bladder cancer detection test
Texus Fibre Ltd Helix Non – Woven Natural Composite Materials
University of Otago – X-imm24

Innovation in Hospitality, Food and Beverage
Sponsored by Yealands Estate Wines

Florentines Patisserie – Global Patisserie
Fonterra Brands New Zealand Ltd – LIGHT PROOF™ bottle
Fonterra Co-operative Group Ltd – Ingredient for high protein applications
Fonterra Research and Development Centre – Alternate Make Cheese (Mozzarella)
Mobi2Go – Mobi2Go
Tegel Food Limited – HPP SMOKED CHICKEN

Innovation in Information Communications Technology
Sponsored by ng Connect

GreenButton – GreenButton Cloud Fabric
Integrity Analysis Ltd – SwingProfile
Konnect Net Ltd – SureMed
Orcon – Orcon Genius Go
Serato INC LP – Serato Remote
SwipedOn Ltd – SwipedOn
Wiki New Zealand – Wiki New Zealand

Innovation in Marketing and Communications
Sponsored by &Some the Engagement Agency

Bank of New Zealand – YouMoney
Firebrand – GetHomeSafe
Flossie.com Ltd – Flossie.com
Kainic Medical Communications – Kainic Medical Communications International Travel Scholarship
Rest In Pets – Cardboard Pet Casket Range
The Marketing Engine – Pass The Idea

Innovation in Media, Music and Entertainment
Sponsored by Idealog

Bank of New Zealand – YouMoney
Cactuslab – Letterboxd
Drumleaf – STAR86
Mogul Limited – Streama
Trigger Happy – Toon Hero

Innovation in Sustainability and Clean-tech
Sponsored by Ideas Accelerator Limited

Goran Stojadinovic – Transformer Support Brackets
ASB Bank – Rural Environmental Compliance Loan
Biopolymer Network – ZealaFoam
Texus Fibre Limited – Helix Non-Woven Natural Composite Materials
Vector – Vector Home Solar Programme

Most Inspiring Individual
Sponsored by New Zealand Innovation Council

Ayla Hutchinson – Kindling Cracker
Steve Haythorne – Mobotech Ltd, Mobot
Patrick Roskam – Roskam Adroit Limited, Gudgeon Pro 5 in 1
William McKegg – Virtue Entertainment Limited, Theatrebox
Lillian Grace – Wiki New Zealand

Export Innovator of the Year
Sponsored by New Zealand Trade and Enterprise

Auckland Harbour Bridge Pathway Trust – SkyPath
Fonterra Research and Development Centre – Alternate Make Cheese (Mozzarella)
Gallagher – i Series Fence Energizer system
GreenBUtton – GreenButton Cloud Fabric
SwipedOn Ltd – SwipedOn

Innovation Excellence in Research
Sponsored by Auckland Museum

Biopolymer Network – ZealaFoam
Droidworx Ltd NZ – EV-Recon Aerial Robot
KM Medical Ltd – The Next Step™ in Resuscitation and Transport Ventilation
University of Otago – X-imm24

Emerging New Zealand Innovator
Sponsored by Unitec Institute of Technology

Auckland Harbour Bridge Pathway Trust – SkyPath
Flossie.com Ltd – Flossie.com
Footfalls and Heartbeats Ltd (FHL) – Footfalls and Heartbeats
StretchSense Limited – StretchSense
SwipedOn Ltd – SwipedOn

~ curated by TME World of Marketing, September 11, 2013

Source: http://www.idealog.co.nz/blog/2013/09/2013-nz-innovators-awards-finalists-revealed