Archive | October 2013

Pass The Award: Pass The Idea at the NZ Innovators Awards

Good news, Pass the Idea received a “Highly Commended” in the “Marketing and Communications” category at the New Zealand Innovators Awards presentation held at the Museum Atrium last Thursday evening.

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Pictured from left: Christoph Drefers, The Award (!), Richard Lee, and Mike Hutcheson (Sponsor)

Entries in this year’s awards were up by 22% so the competition was intense!  According to the organiser, The New Zealand Innovation Council, “The quality of entries this year was outstanding and the evaluators had a very difficult task.”  So we were ecstatic to make it up on stage in such esteemed company.

Steven Joyce, the so called Minister of Everything (including Business, Innovation and Employment) also spoke at the ceremony about the importance of innovation to the New Zealand economy – Pass The Idea received development funding from Callaghan Innovation under Steven Joyce’s Ministry, so was great to see our ultimate supporter at the awards ceremony.

More on the Awards as follows:

Cancer detection test gets Pacific Edge the supreme award at the New Zealand Innovator Awards

By Idealog, October 17, 2013

Dunedin-based biotech company Pacific Edge is this year’s supreme winner of the New Zealand Innovators Awards thanks to its novel cancer detection test Cxbladder.

Thanks to the new Kiwi-developed easy-to-use urine sampling system, clinicians can quickly test for bladder cancer, minimising the need for the patient to go to a laboratory or wait to see a specialist at a time when the cancer could be progressing.

Award evaluators noted how the innovative diagnostic tool was highly accurate and had potential to save lives.

The awards ceremony was held at the Auckland Museum this evening and highlighted the innovative work of a number of New Zealand companies and individuals, including: Fonterra for its unique Alternative Make Cheese (AMC) process used to produce premium Mozzarella on a commercial scale; StretchSense, who have created a soft, stretchy sensor for measuring human body deformation and movement; and 14-year- old Ayla Hutchinson who developed Kindling Cracker – a device used for making wood kindling without dangerously wielding an axe.

“You often hear about how innovative New Zealand is, but there is nothing like these Awards for getting the full perspective. Entries increased by 22% on last year and have come from the length and breadth of New Zealand, from start-up companies and universities – right through to large global corporates,” said Louise Webster, New Zealand Innovation Council CEO and Awards convenor. “It’s amazing to see the talent out there and even better to recognize the best. That’s what the New Zealand Innovators Awards are all about – celebrating an amazing blend of talented people, disciplines and industries”.

Webster added that the “innovation and commercialisation happens on the edge of industries with the cross pollination of ideas and practices from one sector to another”. “The New Zealand Innovators Awards brings these industries and people together to form a national innovation community. We need to shout about our achievements and inspire others to go on a journey of growth through innovation.”

Foundation sponsor Bayer New Zealand is once again heavily involved with the awards, which are also supported by yours truly Idealog, as a media partner, Ideas Accelerator and the New Zealand Innovation Council.

“It is critical for people to be open to new ideas. We must not live in a society that is afraid of taking risks and grasping opportunities. The New Zealand Innovators Awards celebrates these opportunities and encourages innovators across New Zealand to invest in innovation for business growth,” said Bayer ANZ chairperson Jackie Applegate.

~Curated by Pass The Idea. http://www.pass-the-idea.com

Source: http://www.idealog.co.nz/blog/2013/10/cancer-detection-test-gets-pacific-edge-supreme-award-new-zealand-innovator-awards

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Pass The Idea “Highly Commended” 2013 NZ Innovators Awards

Good news, Pass the Idea received a “Highly Commended” in the “Marketing and Communications” category at the New Zealand Innovators Awards presentation held at the Museum Atrium last Thursday evening.

10394944365_54069b4c73_o

Pictured from left: Christoph Drefers, The Award (!), Richard Lee, and Mike Hutcheson (Sponsor)

Entries in this year’s awards were up by 22% so the competition was intense!  According to the organiser, The New Zealand Innovation Council, “The quality of entries this year was outstanding and the evaluators had a very difficult task.”  So we were ecstatic to make it up on stage in such esteemed company.

Steven Joyce, the so called Minister of Everything (including Business, Innovation and Employment) also spoke at the ceremony about the importance of innovation to the New Zealand economy – Pass The Idea received development funding from Callaghan Innovation under Steven Joyce’s Ministry, so was great to see our ultimate supporter at the awards ceremony.

10395068263_1d49d13aa5_o

More on the Awards as follows:

Cancer detection test gets Pacific Edge the supreme award at the New Zealand Innovator Awards

By Idealog, October 17, 2013

Dunedin-based biotech company Pacific Edge is this year’s supreme winner of the New Zealand Innovators Awards thanks to its novel cancer detection test Cxbladder.

Thanks to the new Kiwi-developed easy-to-use urine sampling system, clinicians can quickly test for bladder cancer, minimising the need for the patient to go to a laboratory or wait to see a specialist at a time when the cancer could be progressing.

Award evaluators noted how the innovative diagnostic tool was highly accurate and had potential to save lives.

The awards ceremony was held at the Auckland Museum this evening and highlighted the innovative work of a number of New Zealand companies and individuals, including: Fonterra for its unique Alternative Make Cheese (AMC) process used to produce premium Mozzarella on a commercial scale; StretchSense, who have created a soft, stretchy sensor for measuring human body deformation and movement; and 14-year- old Ayla Hutchinson who developed Kindling Cracker – a device used for making wood kindling without dangerously wielding an axe.

“You often hear about how innovative New Zealand is, but there is nothing like these Awards for getting the full perspective. Entries increased by 22% on last year and have come from the length and breadth of New Zealand, from start-up companies and universities – right through to large global corporates,” said Louise Webster, New Zealand Innovation Council CEO and Awards convenor. “It’s amazing to see the talent out there and even better to recognize the best. That’s what the New Zealand Innovators Awards are all about – celebrating an amazing blend of talented people, disciplines and industries”.

Webster added that the “innovation and commercialisation happens on the edge of industries with the cross pollination of ideas and practices from one sector to another”. “The New Zealand Innovators Awards brings these industries and people together to form a national innovation community. We need to shout about our achievements and inspire others to go on a journey of growth through innovation.”

Foundation sponsor Bayer New Zealand is once again heavily involved with the awards, which are also supported by yours truly Idealog, as a media partner, Ideas Accelerator and the New Zealand Innovation Council.

“It is critical for people to be open to new ideas. We must not live in a society that is afraid of taking risks and grasping opportunities. The New Zealand Innovators Awards celebrates these opportunities and encourages innovators across New Zealand to invest in innovation for business growth,” said Bayer ANZ chairperson Jackie Applegate.

~Curated by Pass The Idea. http://www.pass-the-idea.com

Source: http://www.idealog.co.nz/blog/2013/10/cancer-detection-test-gets-pacific-edge-supreme-award-new-zealand-innovator-awards

Pass The Idea “Highly Commended” NZ Innovator of the Year Awards

Pass the Idea “Highly Commended” in Marketing and Communications Category, NZ Innovator Awards 2013

Cancer detection test gets Pacific Edge the supreme award at the New Zealand Innovator Awards

By Idealog, October 17, 2013 @ 9:10 pm

Dunedin-based biotech company Pacific Edge is this year’s supreme winner of the New Zealand Innovators Awards thanks to its novel cancer detection test Cxbladder.

Thanks to the new Kiwi-developed easy-to-use urine sampling system, clinicians can quickly test for bladder cancer, minimising the need for the patient to go to a laboratory or wait to see a specialist at a time when the cancer could be progressing.

Award evaluators noted how the innovative diagnostic tool was highly accurate and had potential to save lives.

The awards ceremony was held at the Auckland Museum this evening and highlighted the innovative work of a number of New Zealand companies and individuals, including: Fonterra for its unique Alternative Make Cheese (AMC) process used to produce premium Mozzarella on a commercial scale; StretchSense, who have created a soft, stretchy sensor for measuring human body deformation and movement; and 14-year- old Ayla Hutchinson who developed Kindling Cracker – a device used for making wood kindling without dangerously wielding an axe.

“You often hear about how innovative New Zealand is, but there is nothing like these Awards for getting the full perspective. Entries increased by 22% on last year and have come from the length and breadth of New Zealand, from start-up companies and universities – right through to large global corporates,” said Louise Webster, New Zealand Innovation Council CEO and Awards convenor. “It’s amazing to see the talent out there and even better to recognize the best. That’s what the New Zealand Innovators Awards are all about – celebrating an amazing blend of talented people, disciplines and industries”.

Webster added that the “innovation and commercialisation happens on the edge of industries with the cross pollination of ideas and practices from one sector to another”. “The New Zealand Innovators Awards brings these industries and people together to form a national innovation community. We need to shout about our achievements and inspire others to go on a journey of growth through innovation.”

Foundation sponsor Bayer New Zealand is once again heavily involved with the awards, which are also supported by yours truly Idealog, as a media partner, Ideas Accelerator and the New Zealand Innovation Council.

“It is critical for people to be open to new ideas. We must not live in a society that is afraid of taking risks and grasping opportunities. The New Zealand Innovators Awards celebrates these opportunities and encourages innovators across New Zealand to invest in innovation for business growth,” said Bayer ANZ chairperson Jackie Applegate.

Below is the full list of this year’s New Zealand Innovators Awards winners:

Supreme New Zealand Innovator

Sponsored by Bayer New Zealand

This award is presented by Bayer New Zealand to the best overall entry. The Supreme Award winner is chosen from all categories.

2013 WINNER – PACIFIC EDGE LTD with Cxbladder

Cxbladder is a novel gene test for the detection and management of bladder cancer. Patient compliance is significantly enhanced with the easy-to-use, in home or in clinic urine sample system. This detection system minimises the need to go to a laboratory collection centre or wait to see the specialist at a time when the cancer can be progressing.

http://www.pacificedgedx.com/

Emerging New Zealand Innovator

Sponsored by Unitec Institute of Technology

This award is presented by Bayer New Zealand to the best overall entry. The Supreme Award winner is chosen from all categories.

2013 WINNER – STRETCHSENSE with StretchSense

StretchSense has created soft stretchy sensors for measuring human body deformation and movement. These sensors do not interfere with natural motion, are soft, unobtrusive, comfortable, wireless, and easy to use.

http://www.stretchsense.com

Innovation Excellence in Research

Sponsored by Auckland Museum

This award celebrates those that have started on the research and commercialisation journey and who have completed a research project that has excellent commercialisation potential and impact.

2013 WINNER – BIOPOLYMER NETWORK with Zelafoam

Zelafoam is a low density moulded bioplastic foam that is; cost-effective, made from renewable resources and is an eco-friendly alternative to expanded polystyrene particle foams.

http://www.biopolymernetwork.com/

Export Innovator of the Year

Sponsored by New Zealand Trade and Enterprise

This award celebrates organisations that have achieved excellence in export innovation. To grow New Zealand’s economy we need to encourage and recognise organisation that have developed great new products and services that are export focused.

2013 WINNER – FONTERRA RESEARCH CENTRE LTD with Alternate Make Cheese (Mozzarella)

Fonterra’s unique Alternative Make Cheese (AMC) process produces a premium performance frozen Mozzarella shred on a commercial scale. When thawed the Mozzarella, has a superior functionality and composition structure, which allows for a richer flavour, unique stretch and melt properties.

http://www.fonterra.com/global/en/about/our+locations/newzealand/fonterra+research+centre

Most Inspiring Individual

Sponsored by New Zealand Innovation Council

This award is given to an individual that has shown outstanding innovation success in their field of expertise, either through the development of intellectual property or through the launch of a new product or venture.

2013 WINNER – AYLA HUTCHINSON with Kindling Cracker

The Kindling Cracker allows people to make kindling without dangerously wielding an axe. Safe and easy to use, the kindling cracker operates by tapping wood with a mallet onto a stationary blade that splits it. It requires less force to split wood than using an axe and is suitable for all ages and for people with arthritis and other disabilities.

http://www.kindlingcracker.com/

Innovation in Design and Engineering

Sponsored by James & Wells Intellectual Property Limited

2013 WINNER – STRETCHSENSE with StretchSense

StretchSense has created soft stretchy sensors for measuring human body deformation and movement. These sensors do not interfere with natural motion, are soft, unobtrusive, comfortable, wireless, and easy to use.

www.stretchsense.com

Innovation in Sustainability and Clean-tech

Sponsored by Ideas Accelerator Limited

2013 WINNER – VECTOR LTD with Home Solar Programme

Vector’s Home Solar Programme is designed to make solar accessible to everyday people. The programme provides customers with a sustainable choice in energy used to power their homes by making solar power accessible, reliable and intelligent.

http://www.vector.co.nz/

Innovation in Environment and Agriculture

Sponsored by Bayer New Zealand

2013 WINNER – PLANT AND FOOD RESEARCH LTD with Pheromones for Sustainable Pest Control

Plant and Food Research have utilised sex pheromones released by the females of many insect species to disrupt communication between insects, reducing mating and insect population, and therefore, reducing reliance on chemical controls and improving market access.

Plant and Food Research have developed formulations, blends and dispensers specifically for New Zealand apple orchards now a key part of the Apple Futures programme, delivering apples for export with ultra-low residues that meet market regulations and supermarket customer assurance programmes.

http://www.plantandfood.co.nz/

Innovation in Health and Science

Sponsored by Ko Awatea CMDHB

2013 WINNER – PACIFIC EDGE LTD with Cxbladder

Cxbladder is a novel gene test for the detection and management of bladder cancer. Patient compliance is significantly enhanced with the easy-to-use, in home or in clinic urine sample system. This detection system minimises the need to go to a laboratory collection centre or wait to see the specialist at a time when the cancer can be progressing.

http://www.pacificedgedx.com/

Innovation in Hospitality, Food & Beverage

Sponsored by Yealands Estate Wines

2013 WINNER – MOBI2GO LTD with Mobi2Go

Mobi2Go is an integrated online and mobile food ordering platform providing unique customer ordering solutions for the retail hospitality industry. Mobi2Go is an integrated online POS gateway that manages all aspects of online ordering and payment, product control and customer management.

http://www.mobi2go.com/

Innovation in Information Communications Technology

Sponsored by ng Connect

2013 WINNER – GREENBUTTON LTD with Cloud Fabric

GreenButton Cloud Fabric is a specialized PaaS (platform as a service) that enables businesses to harness the vast computing power of cloud technology. The platform enables companies to move compute intensive workloads to the cloud in a fast, cost efficient manner with no recoding required.

http://www.greenbutton.com/

Innovation in Marketing and Communications

Sponsored by Tangible Media

2013 WINNER – KAINIC MEDICAL COMMUNICATIONS LTD with International Travel Scholarship

Kainic is a start-up specialist medical writing company almost exclusively exporting services to a UK client base of medical communications agencies, the biotechnology industry and scientific and healthcare communities.

Kainic has developed a unique marketing strategy the Kainic Medical Communications International Travel Scholarship. This annual campaign has built and strengthened Kainic’s reputation globally in its key markets and healthcare communities and has allowed Kainic to interact with local and international markets simultaneously.

http://kainicmedical.com/

Innovation in Media, Music and Entertainment

Sponsored by Idealog

2013 WINNER – TRIGGER HAPPY LTD with Toon Hero

Trigger Happy have taken their expertise in animation and made it easy, social and accessible for everyone to experience with the app TOON HERO. This first-of-its-kind iPad app allows users of all ages to easily create their own animated stories, jokes and more using world-famous characters, which can be shared online and across many social media platforms.

http://www.iamtriggerhappy.com/index.html

~ Curated by The Marketing Engine, October 18, 2013.  Pass the Idea http://www.pass-the-idea.com

Source: http://www.idealog.co.nz/blog/2013/10/cancer-detection-test-gets-pacific-edge-supreme-award-new-zealand-innovator-awards

ANA Masters of Marketing Conference: Recap

ANA Masters Of Marketing Recap: Today’s Cost Center Is Tomorrow’s Revenue Generator

October 9th, 2013

By  

marketers-note

“Marketer’s Note” is a weekly column informing marketers about the rapidly evolving, digital marketing technology ecosystem. It is written by Joanna O’Connell, Director of Research, AdExchanger.  

Having just returned from the three-day ANA Masters of Marketing conference, held this past weekend in Phoenix, I thought it worth sharing my thoughts with marketers on what I saw, heard and ultimately came away with:

The theme of the conference was GROWTH. I put this in capital letters because what I heard time and again from the marketing leaders who spoke is that marketing as a discipline has the power – now more than ever – to influence enterprise-level business decisions and drive business growth. In fact, I listened to CMO after CMO discuss the seat at the table he or she now has in developing innovative ways to find and connect with consumers – not just through advertising and marketing, but in areas like product development and the customer’s experience in-store. Now that’s cool – the implication couldn’t be clearer: The legacy thinking of “marketing as expense” is finally giving way to a belief in “marketing as revenue generator.” (And, by the way, it’s no accident that the average CMO’s tenure is now at 45 months, up from a paltry 23 months back in 2006, according to executive search firm Spencer Stuart.)

The customer is in charge and she is young, mobile and very demanding.  Stephen Quinn, CMO of Walmart, set the tone for the conference when he noted,  “The customer is empowered – they have tools that put them in the driver’s seat. It’s a painful transition for us, but it will make every one of us marketers customercentric.” And if you’re not focused on millennials — those multidevice, always-plugged-in 18-to-30-year-old digital natives — you’re a fool. At least that’s what every attendee heard loud and clear, over and over. (Noted Quinn: Millennials’ retail spending will surpass baby boomers’ by 2017). Visa CMO Antonio Lucio went so far as to exclaim: “I fundamentally believe that since the ’60s no other generation has been so equipped to dramatically change the world as the millennials.” For Visa, this doesn’t just mean marketing to this crowd; it means embracing them from the inside out, hiring fresh young faces into key marketing jobs to move new thinking to the center of Visa’s marketing activities.

The future of marketing is personalized, one to one.  If the customer is in charge, we’d better give her what she wants, where and when she wants it, said many speakers in many ways. As Marc Benioff, CEO of Salesforce (recent acquirer of CRM platform ExactTarget) counseled everyone, “Here’s the key: You have to remember that behind every app there is a customer. The problem is most companies don’t know their customers. Wherever the customer is, that is where we need to be — in the store, on the site, in email, on Facebook. … We’d better know it. It’s got to be a one-to-one relationship regardless of the customer touch point.” The challenge we face as an industry is how to get there: We remain mired in siloed thinking, channel-specific tools and a tracking and targeting foundation – the third-party cookie – that is woefully inadequate. I predict big change will come in the next year on this front: If every leading CMO knows that one-to-one relationships with consumers are the future of marketing, the realization that the industry doesn’t yet support it is right around the corner.

The big idea lives on, but it must be authentic. This conference was, above all, a celebration of great ideas – Chrysler’s “America’s Second Half” spot, featuring Clint Eastwood, brought the crowd to tears (I have to admit, that concept was gold). We were treated to the hilarious, the sexy, the thought-provoking and the emotionally wrenching from leading brands like Walmart, Mars, Marriott, Subway and Hennessy – and it was obvious that the emotional resonance of a big idea in marketing still matters. A lot. There was, simultaneously, major focus on bringing a sense of purpose and authenticity to marketing communications – staying true to the fundamentals of the brand (i.e. Chrysler’s highly resonant “Imported from Detroit” tagline) while engaging in the larger world in productive ways (i.e. Walmart’s focus on guaranteeing jobs to veterans and ConAgra’s work in fighting childhood hunger in the US) – today’s consumers expect nothing less from the companies with whom they choose to align.

Advertising remains the workhorse of marketing – unglamorous but critical. That said, a big idea is nothing if no one experiences it. While there were many mentions of Super Bowl advertising and the odd Facebook reference, not a whole lot of time was devoted to all the hard-working advertising media that is still so valuable in the transmission of the big idea. It made me wonder – did the crowd not believe that advertising matters so much anymore? Or did they simply think it wasn’t worth bragging about in front of a crowd of other marketers? My sense is both, a topic on which I could devote an entire column (another day). Thankfully, one speaker noticeably broke ranks and talked about his unique experience building an advertising strategy from scratch – with USAA, a brand that historically did not advertise. Roger Adams, CMO of USAA, took the time to celebrate the business success they’d achieved through advertising, noting, “Rarely do you have an opportunity to build advertising and ad positioning from scratch – using data, deep customer insight and focusing on finding the unique proposition. If you do your homework, you find it does work. We used predictive modeling to make media-mix decisions and it’s been very enlightening and helpful. When I started the journey I couldn’t even spell ROI.”

The power of data is still under-recognized, or at least undercelebrated. I expected a lot more talk about the power of data and its application in real-time technologies like demand-side platforms (DSPs) and data-management platforms (DMPs) for smart, fluid decision-making. There were moments – such as when MediaVest USA CEO Brian Terkelsen exclaimed to a roomful of senior marketers, “If you can’t explain what a DMP is, you’ve got to go back to school quickly.” — but not nearly enough. It was another moment when I wondered – is the issue that data isn’t seen as glamorous, or is it scary to this crowd? I have to thank Stephen Quinn of Walmart, again bringing smart thinking to the discussion, for pointing out, “Data and analytics are becoming so much more important to marketing. For a lot of folks, that’s not why they got into marketing. They’ve got to get savvy with data and technology as well.” We should heed the sage advice of unlikely source David Leonhardt, Washington bureau chief of The New York Times, who challenged the crowd with this question: “Ask yourself, ‘Is what we’re doing working? Or do we just think it’s working because we’ve always done it this way and we think it should work?’ It’s not about math; it’s about reality.”

Marketers, I hope this inspires you or at least gets you contemplating your own organization’s thinking about the role and value of marketing in today’s brave new world.  I’d love your thoughts either way!

~ Curated by The Marketing Engine, October 17, 2013.

Source: http://www.adexchanger.com/marketers-note/ana-masters-of-marketing-recap-todays-cost-center-is-tomorrows-revenue-generator/

4 Digital Laws

What Can We Expect from the Next Decade of Technology?

What Can We Expect from the Next Decade of Technology?

Technology tends to run in cycles.  Microsoft ruled the 90’s by building essential software for enterprises.  Then Apple created a new device driven marketplace in which the consumer was king.  What will drive the next decade?

While these things are always hard to predict with any specificity, much of the writing is already on the wall. Humanlike, no-touch interfaces will combine with a pervasive array of sensors and intelligent back-end systems to form a new Web of Things.  Computing will become truly ubiquitous.

This new era of computing will be different than anything we’ve seen before.  Technology will cease to be something we turn on and off, but will become an inextricable part of not only our environment, but ourselves.  It is a future that is both utopian and dystopian (depending on your perspective), in that the human experience will change dramatically.

4 Digital Laws

When William Gibson said, “The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed,” he meant that the seeds of the future are sown in the present.  While there is no telling the exact composition of the fruit that those seeds will bear, we can expect the stalks to grow according to laws already apparent.

The information economy has been around long enough for us to have identified four digital laws that drive the growth and direction of technology:

Moore’s Law: Back in the 80’s and 90’s, when computers first landed on our desktops, we were mostly concerned with processing power, because we wanted to be sure that our hardware would be capable of running the software that made computers useful.

Today, however, most of us pay little attention to processing speeds because we’re confident that whatever device we buy will be fast enough.  That’s because of Moore’s law, a principle first identified by Intel cofounder Gordon Moore in 1965 which states that the power of our chips doubles about every 18 months.

Kryder’s Law: When Steve Jobs first returned to Apple, he revamped the product line and then went searching for the next big thing.  An avid music fan, he was disappointed with the primitive MP3 devices on the market and envisioned a new product that would allow him to carry around 1000 songs in his pocket.

In a matter of months, his team identified a supplier which could deliver drives that were both small enough and powerful enough to make good on his vision.  The iPod was born and Apple was on its way to becoming the most valuable company on the planet.

Of course, 1000 songs is no big deal anymore.  Today’s iPods carry 40,000 and you can buy a drive that can play 1000 full length movies for a few hundred dollars, less than the price of those original iPods.  This is thanks to Kryder’s law, which doubles storage about every 12 months, even faster than Moore’s law increases processing power.

Nielsen’s Law: Even after we stopped worrying about the speed of our computers and our hard drives became big enough that we didn’t need to clean out our e-mail archives every month, we still had trouble accessing content because Internet connections were so slow.  Now with 4G mobile connections, we scarcely have to worry about it.

This is thanks to Nielsen’s law, which observes that effective bandwidth doubles every 21 months.  That’s’s quite a bit slower than Moore’s law and Kryder’s law, which is why bandwidth has historically been such a limiting factor, but at current speeds we can do almost everything we want to and 5G is expected around 2020.

Kaku’s Caveman Law: Now that we have eradicated most technical limits to everyday use, the most important law to pay attention to is what Michio Kaku calls the “caveman law”, which can be stated as follows:

Whenever there is a conflict between modern technology and the desires of our primitive ancestors, these primitive desires win each time.

It is this last law, riding the wave of the previous three, that will drive the next decade of technology.  Our devices will become not only vastly more powerful, but also more natural and eventually disappear altogether.  Effective computing will become less dependent on expertise and more a function of desire.

A New Digital Paradigm

While the digital laws may seem to be working steadily on our behalf, the numbers can be deceiving because they actually represent accelerating returns.  Simply follow the pace of Moore’s law alone and you will quickly realize that we will advance roughly the same amount in the next 18 months as we did in the previous thirty years.

At some point, a difference in degree becomes a difference in kind.  Having exhausted most of the possibilities we saw for computers a decade ago, we are beginning to focus our technology on completely new tasks, such as nanotechnologygenomics and energy. Clearly, we are entering a new digital paradigm.

To get an idea of how this will all play out, look at how supercomputing has progressed at IBM.  In the 90’s it focused its efforts on pure computation, eventually defeating chess champion Garry Kasparov with brute force.  In 2011, its Watson computer triumphed at Jeopardy!, a game show that requires intuition as well as intelligence.

Now, IBM is repurposing Watson for human professions, such as medicinelaw and even customer service.  The line between man and machine is blurring beyond anything we could imagine even a few years ago.

Atoms Become The New Bits

There is probably no place the expansion of the digital economy is as dramatic as in the field of manufacturing, which until recently was assumed to be a low tech area best left to sweatshops and cheap labor.  Today, as Steve Denning reported in Forbes, companies from Apple to GE are finding it makes more sense to keep manufacturing closer to home.

The reason is that we are in the midst of a new industrial revolution where the informational content of manufactured goods is becoming more valuable than the physical content.  An array of technologies, ranging from CAD software to 3D printing to lights out factories which are entirely populated with robots, is reinventing the economics of making things.

Just as people gathered in places like the Homebrew Computer Club in the 70’s, there are now dozens of fab labs scattered across the globe where hobbyists can meet and build prototypes.  These designs can then be manufactured at just about any scale by services like Ponoko and Pololu.

Open software is now giving way to  open hardware where, as Chris Anderson puts it, they “give away the bits and charge for the atoms.”  The maker economy is so potentially powerful that there is already talk of a Moore’s law for atoms that will bring accelerating returns to physical products.

Tech Becomes More Like Pharma

When the personal computer revolution took hold, it was driven by garage entrepreneurs.  Hobbyists tinkering with homemade kits could outfox big corporations and turn a clever idea into a billion dollar business.  This trend only deepened as software became dominant and any kid with a keyboard could compete with industry giants.

Smart companies embraced the start-up culture and became more nimble.  The tech industry began to resemble the entertainment industry, with the business press spending more and more time in sweaty convention halls hoping to catch a glimpse of the next blockbuster hit.

That’s changing as devices and applications are becoming secondary to platforms.  The new paradigm shifts, such as IBM’s Watson, Google Brain and Microsoft’s Azure take years and billions of dollars to develop.  The upshot is that the tech business is starting to look more like pharma, where the R&D pipeline is as important as today’s products.

And for better or worse, that’s where we’re heading.  Whereas previous tech waves transformed business and communication, the next phase will be marked by technology so pervasive and important, we’ll scarcely know it’s there.


Greg Satell is an internationally recognized authority on Digital Strategy and Innovation. He consults and speaks in the areas of digital innovation, innovation management, digital marketing and publishing, as well as offshore web and app development. His blog is Digital Tonto and you can follow him on Twitter.~ Curated by The World of Marketing, October 10, 2013.

Source: http://www.innovationexcellence.com/blog/2013/10/07/what-can-we-expect-from-the-next-decade-of-technology/

The Customer-Activated Enterprise: Insights from Global C-Suite Study

Inside the C-Suite’s Mind: Top Challenges and Opportunities

by Ayaz Nanji  |  October 7, 2013
C-suite leaders (CxOs) say changes in technology are dramatically affecting their operations and forcing them to overhaul every aspect of their business, according to a new report by IBM.

In the next three to five years, the vast majority of CMOs want to integrate their cross-channel touchpoints (87%), enhance their use of analytics to capture customer insights (83%), and use social networks to foster collaboration (78%), the IBM Global C-suite Study found.

CMOs aren’t alone: Four-fifths of CIOs aim to digitize their front offices within the next few years to sync with customers more effectively, and 84% plan to add new mobile means of interacting with customers, according to the research.

However, despite recognizing the importance of technological changes, C-suite leaders are struggling to strike the right balance between the social, digital, and physical worlds, IBM said.

An analysis by IBM supercomputer Watson of the interviews with top leaders found that businesses are grappling with creating cohesive social media plans, balancing competing priorities, and measuring investment returns.

Below, additional key findings from the study, which was based on face-to-face conversations with more than 4,000 C-suite executives (CxOs) worldwide.

CMOs Feel Unprepared

  • CMOs’ top priority this year is to design great customer experiences for mobile apps.
  • Using social media to engage customers is second, and using integrated suites to manage customers is third.
  • CMOs are struggling to keep abreast of the rapid pace of change in the digital and online worlds; they feel even less prepared to cope with big data than they did in 2011, and they have made little headway in coming to grips with the social media landscape.

Customer Interactions

  • In 2012, 57% of CEOs expected digital channels to become one of their company’s key means of interacting with customers within the next five years. In 2013, 52% of CxOs say they are already there.
  • CxOs say this trend will continue: 88% say they will interact digitally with customers even more in the next three to five years.

Rise of the Customer

  • More than half of CxOs say customers now have a considerable influence on their enterprises.
  • In fact, CEOs say customers exert a bigger influence on their organization’s business strategy than all but the C-suite itself.

  • However, despite this increased influence, one-third of CEOs worry that the rest of their C-suite is out of touch with customers.

External Forces

  • CEOs consider technology the most important external force shaping their organizations, and the rest of the C-suite agrees.
  • However, CxOs vary on whether market factors or macroeconomic factors are the second most important external force.

About the researchThe Global C-Suite Study was based on face-to-face interviews with 4,183 top executives covering more than 20 industries in 70 countries.

 ~ Curated by TME World of Marketing, October 8, 2013.
Source:  http://www.marketingprofs.com/charts/2013/11808/inside-csuite-mind-top-challenges-opportunities